RITUALS FOR LAMMAS


RITUALS FOR LAMMAS

Keep in mind that rituals are never  written in stone, you can change and adapt it to what best suits your needs.

RITUAL ONE:

Make your altar table and decorations (see “About Lammas” for colours, foods and altar information). Make sure you include corn/oats and apple. When you’re ready to begin, cast your circle in your usual way, or by invoking a God and Goddess associated with Lammas (again, see “About Lammas” for a list of associated deities). Standing in front of your altar, take some of the grain or oats in your hand and hold it above you. Say something like:

“We celebrate the First Harvest, a time when the fruits of nature sacrifice themselves so that we may survive. The sun now wanes, and I ask that Great Spirit helps me to understand and accept my own personal sacrifices I must make in my own life. The moon now grows in strength, and I ask that the Moon Goddess bless me with her wisdom and power.”

Rub the corn between both hands and let it fall down towards your altar. Say something like:

“I share in the fruits of the First Harvest, so that I might share in the wisdom it offers. Goddess of the Moon, Mother of All, God of the Sun, Father to All, I thank you for that which you’ve given me. May I always remember ‘harm none’, and may all that I do be for the highest good.”

Then take a piece of apple, bite into it, and immerse yourself in the taste experience. If performing this ritual with more than one person, you can either have cut pieces of fruit prepared in a bowl which you would then pass on, or you can pass a single apple on.  Meditate, or reflect, on the good that has passed so far this wheel cycle, and sacrifices that have been made along the way. Think about how you’ve shared you good fortune with others, even if it only meant smiling at a stranger.

You can now do any magickal work you’ve selected for the circle, or simply write about your thoughts in your journal if you have one.

Give thanks and release the circle.

RITUAL TWO:

Make your altar table and decorations (see “About Lammas” for colours, foods and altar information). Make sure you include a white candle and a golden yellow candle, as well as sage or rosemary. When you’re ready to begin, cast your circle in your usual way, or by invoking a God and Goddess associated with Lammas (again, see “About Lammas” for a list of associated deities).

Begin by meditating on what you really desire and the sacrifices you are able or willing to make for your dreams. If life seems unfair, spend some time asking Great Spirit / God & Goddess to melt away/release your fears, obstacles and doubts. Can you trust again, can you ask of others what you need? Are you prepared to sacrifice certainty for trust? We do not have to sacrifice our dreams, but we do need to let go of what is not good for us, and stop constantly worrying over what can never be, or can be no more.

Light both the white and the gold candles and say something like:

“I reach out in the trust that my needs will be met. I free myself from what holds me back from fulfilment.”

Scatter a small pinch of sage or rosemary in each flame, and leave the candles to burn. Make plans for your future and say goodbye to what can or should be no more. Scatter the rest of the herb in the garden as an offering.

You can now do any magickal work you’ve selected for the circle, or simply write about your thoughts in your journal if you have one.

Give thanks and release the circle.

RITUAL THREE:

Light an orange candle every evening if possible for a week around the festival.

Sprinkle a pinch of salt in the flame and let go of any injustice that cannot be put right but which needs to be released from your mind to set you free.

Then add a small pinch of dried sage to the flame and name a blessing however small or an unexpected kindness you have received in the previous few months.

At the end of the week, make a practical gesture or spoken small blessing to someone who does not merit it. Alternatively if you feel you have been unjustly treated and cannot put matters right, then at the end of the week, knot dried grasses or pluck the petals of a dying flower, one for each injustice and cast them into running water or bury them, planting late flowering seeds or autumn flowers.

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